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Isaac Mashaba’s book is a frank and honest appraisal of much of what has gone wrong in Africa, and in particular with South Africa. His understanding of the current toxic political environment and its impact on South Africa, sheds a light on much of the country and the prevailing political and social dynamics, and indeed the continent’s challenges and problems.

Whereas he addresses and discusses many burning issues within the current political and social landscape, he also argues that the clock of chaos and dysfunctionality can be turned back, or stopped and reset. He contends that voter anger, apathy, despair, and anti-government sentiments are the result of a neglect of governance and its subsequent effect on democracy.

Mashaba argues that South Africa, and indeed Africa, needs to redirect the current national and political trajectories if there is to be progress. As a continent that bears its own scars, he urges a move away from living in the past, and argues that if the process of continual blame and mudslinging is not redirected and accountability taken for the current situation, the future will forever remain bleak and dark. His thoughts on intervention and rectification require urgent consideration and investigation.

South Africa, and Africa, require dedicated politicians who refrain from preaching populism, and serve the people instead of serving themselves.

This welcome book shines a bright light in South Africa’s growing darkness.

Paperback, 212 pages

Customer Reviews

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D
D.A.W.
Wonderful work Mr Mashaba!

Wonderful work Mr Mashaba! This manuscript is evidence of a commendable insight into leadership. The author reflects a high level of academic integration. Although not an academic study, he shows the wonderful ability to apply the relevant theory on a high level. His understanding, discussion and application of theoretical models within context reflects to a high-level argument. The reflection within the South African context is commendable with a writing style that is suggestive to high level information integration.
Let this insight not get lost but let it be applied within the leadership context you are practicing.
(Dr Albert Wort, Phd - Personal Professional Leadership. University of Johannesburg)

D
D.W.d.B.
Highly recommended!

Isaac Mashaba’s overview of African politics is commendably fresh and steers away from mudslinging, instead focussing on an apolitical approach; the more casual writing style rids it of the limitations of a purely academic work. He has established credibility by merely stating the course of history and not getting emotionally involved. Of interest is that his well-formulated criticisms are directed at the antagonist and protagonist alike, with a firm dollop of ‘realpolitik’, which gives the book a sense of authenticity without being contemptuous of the raw lesions which still exist in South Africa’s social fibre. Mashaba has shown wisdom, and realism, and an urgent need for the unassuming truth, nowadays a rare commodity absent in a plethora of questionable doctrine and fake news. Highly recommended.
(Wim de Beer, MPhil, University of Johannesburg, Soweto Campus)

D
D.E.L.M.
Well worth reading!

A true South African patriot, Isaac Mashaba’s book clearly argues that it is very possible for South Africa to correct and redirect its current failing trajectory as a nation. His book makes a valuable contribution to the everyday reader’s understanding of the nature of state fragility and the contributing factors to such a state. Mashaba implores South Africa’s leaders to take the moral high ground and act with conviction and determination, and without fear or favour, to steer the country away from the brink of imminent fragility. This is a timely book for the population at large, and well worth reading.
(Dr Edward L. Mienie, Ph.D. INCM, Associate Professor of Strategic & Security Studies, University of North Georgia, USA)

D
D.M.R.
This is a timely book that will find a wide audience.

Isaac Mashaba’s book raises numerous questions regarding efficiency and effectiveness of governance in South Africa. The primary area, and the central question of the text is why the country (or the continent in general) is not doing better when it comes to political, socio-economic, or security outputs of the system. He approaches the problem from several different conceptual perspectives and deals with the most imminent problems of the country. This book would potentially appeal to anyone (politicians, decision makers, stake holders, and civil society) involved in South African or even African politics. There are elements of the book that could be used on undergraduate and postgraduate courses (students of political science, public policy). This is a timely book that will find a wide audience.
Dr Martin Riegl, Ph.D, Institute of Political Studies, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic