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The end of the Second World War may have heralded peace in Europe but conflicts in Southern Africa were about to begin. The imperial powers were weakened by the cost of war and a string of wars challenged colonial rule in countries such as Namibia, Angola and Rhodesia. Once independence was achieved, civil wars between rival factions unfamiliar with democratic principles resulted. Liberation movements such as those in South Africa demanded self-rule and end to Apartheid. Tribal feuds, corruption and the ambitions of dictators led to more conflicts such as the protracted fighting in the Congo.

These were wars that ran on until both sides were exhausted often only to be re-kindled after short periods of uneasy peace. The cost in human and material terms has been devastating and in too many cases remain so. Economic development has been frustrated and the result is often poverty, abuse and genocide. The Author who knows Southern Africa as a native is superbly equipped to tell this fascinating if tragic record.

Hardcover, 224 pages.

Available from 1 December 2018

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M
M.O.
A masterpiece of personal insight and strategic understanding

Professor Paul Moorcraft has written what will undoubtedly be recognised as the definitive work on war and revolution in Southern Africa over the last 60 years. It is also his masterpiece in his writing on Southern Africa. This book is a must-read for anybody interested in the political and military history of Southern Africa. It is a military history as well as a political one and the military detail is impressive. As a former instructor at the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst in England and having also taught at the UK Joint Services Command and Staff College, Professor Moorcraft is uniquely qualified to describe the broad picture of South African military strategy in the region. When these qualifications are combined with his own personal experiences and insights as a front-line war correspondence in Southern Africa, they make for a remarkable and compelling book.

A
A.M.
As comprehensive as it gets!

This is an extremely comprehensive review of the recent military history of Southern Africa. This is a much more academic treatment of a topic than the author's customary style with a staggering amount of detail right down to individual battlefield accounts.
If you are looking for an all embracing account of all the various players with their frequently evolving alliances and disputes you will be well rewarded, although you will need to concentrate if you really want to understand the ZANU, ZANLA and ZIPRAS of that particular world!
If that is the level of detail that you want it is difficult to imagine a better source.There are the usual anecdotes and insights from someone who was well connected and close to the action.
Well worth a read for the specialist.